Chuck Broes Discusses Five Styles of Leadership

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Chuck Broes draws on over forty years of business acumen to offer a perspective on business philosophies and tactics for the next decade. This piece is part 4 of a series.

Chuck Broes fields many questions from aspiring business executives who want to learn more about leadership. Many individuals who have not previously served in leadership positions, explains Chuck Broes, develop an inaccurate idea of what it takes to lead. Of the myriad management styles Chuck Broes has encountered during his long career, five of them stand out. Chuck Broes encourages managers to choose one that dovetails with their individual values and their company’s culture.

The first leadership style identified by Chuck Broes is the “Charismatic leader.” Employees rally around a charismatic leader mostly because of the amiability of the individual more than the authority that they wield. People want to work for a charismatic leader, explains Chuck Broes, and little other impetus is needed. Chuck Broes has found the charismatic leader approach very helpful in getting big ventures off the ground. Chuck Broes adds, however, that charismatic leaders sometimes have trouble managing wayward employees, unless they adapt and adopt additional styles of leadership.

Chuck Broes describes another management persona as the “Participative leader.” According to Chuck Broes, management is more engaged and enthusiastic if they are involved in the decision-making process. For Chuck Broes, using participative leadership makes it easier to build consensus and keep people committed to action, because they have a stake in the decisions.

Chuck Broes also finds the “Situational leader” to be a very helpful and useful management style. Chuck Broes explains that the situational leader is an adaptive leader with an eye on several variables. Situational leaders assess each issue on its own terms, explains Chuck Broes, taking into account the moods, motivations and relationships of all those involved. According to Chuck Broes, situational leadership is a good improvisational style for unexpected challenges.

The final two leadership styles are much subtler, says Chuck Broes, and have the potential to be the most powerful. These two styles are the “Servant leader” and the “Quiet leader.” Servant leaders win their following and ensure success by serving the employees on the ground that are under management. Servant leaders go straight to the roots of their company, says Chuck Broes, cultivating strength, dedication and productivity from the bottom up.

Quiet leaders couch their will in humility, explains Chuck Broes, giving credit to others rather than taking it for themselves. A quiet leader speaks with actions more than words. Chuck Broes appreciates the quiet leader approach because such a person can very effectively motivate others.

About Chuck Broes

Chuck Broes is a business and healthcare visionary whose career spans over 45 years in domestic and foreign markets. In the past, Chuck Broes has specialized in the areas of incubation, start-ups, mergers and acquisitions, corporate turn-arounds and roll-ups. Chuck Broes has served in various executive roles including Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer.

Chuck Broes began his unique career with Health Industries (Jack LaLanne European Health Spas) from its founding to becoming a national chain of over one hundred locations, then going public and later being sold to a Fortune 500 company. This positioned Chuck Broes to serve in key leadership roles within the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries working with regulatory issues involving the FDA, ISO and CE marking and EDI. Chuck Broes was involved intimately as part of the senior management team at Wellmark Corporation, a pioneer company in healthcare clearinghouse services and ANSI X12 standards, which became a subsidiary of Primark Corporation, a NYSE Company.

Later, Chuck Broes founded EliteCorp International, Inc. and served as its Chief Executive Officer. In that capacity Chuck Broes’ business experience has included the facilitation of public companies, acquisitions, mergers, strategic alliances, IPOs and turnarounds. Associated projects for Chuck Broes have ranged from concept to development and production, including the integration of national data communication networks, facilities management, and healthcare system technologies.

Chuck Broes has served as a member of the Ethics Committee of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida for fifteen years. In 2008, Chuck Broes turned his full attention to Quantum Immunologics, Inc., which he helped found and where he currently serves as CEO. Chuck Broes leads Quantum Immunologics in the pursuit of the research, development and implementation of new immunotherapy protocols for the treatment of cancer. Chuck Broes has initiated clinical trials that are currently underway and new patents have been filed providing the company with a pipeline for ongoing improvements in cancer treatment.

According to Chuck Broes, Quantum Immunologics was formed for the sole purpose of developing, implementing and distributing new advanced levels of proprietary therapeutic treatments and diagnostic tools. Chuck Broes presents Quantum Immunologics’ mission as fostering the development and support for these and other technologies that are complementary to its current portfolio of patented intellectual properties that are focused on immune diseases and disorders.

To contact Chuck Broes or for more information about Quantum Immunologics please visit: www.quantumimmunologics.com or call 866-213-4594.


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